Wednesday, February 22, 2012

The Semi-Dual Stories: Coming from Altus Press

Altus Press, which is the home of Riding the Pulp Trail, has a new collection coming out that is the first of its kind and sounds pretty fascinating. The Semi-Dual stories were an an occult detective series written by two pulp writers, J.U. Giesy & Junius B. Smith. The first series appeared in the Cavalier in 1912, which is what Altus Press will be reprinting in this first volume.

Matt Moring from Altus was kind enough to send me this checklist of all the Semi-Dual stories that appeared over twenty years.

I'm going to stick my neck out here and ask the most basic and probably dumbest of all questions: Why were they called the Semi-Dual stories?

So look for the first collection of these to appear, probably by the end of this year. In addition, if you want to keep current with what Altus is publishing, you can go to their website (which is a really cool site), and also follow them on Facebook (facebook.com/altuspress).



Semi Dual by

1912
1. The Occult Detector - Cavalier 3 parts Feb 17, 24, Mar 2
2. The Significance of High “D” - Cavalier 3 parts Mar 9, 16, 23
3. The Wisteria Scarf - Cavalier 3 parts Jun 1, 8, 15
4. The Purple Light - Cavalier 3 parts Oct 5, 12, 19

1913
5. The Master Mind - Cavalier Jan 25
6. Rubies of Doom - Cavalier 2 part Jul 5, 12
7. The House of the Ego - Cavalier 3 parts Sep 20, 27, Oct 4
8. The Ghost of the Name - Cavalier Dec 20

1914
9. The Curse of Quetzal - All-Story Magazine Nov 28

1915
10. The Web of Destiny - All-Story Weekly 2 parts Mar 20, 27
11. Snared - All-Story Weekly 3 parts Dec 11, 18, 25

1916
12. Box 991 - All-Story Weekly 3 parts Jun 3, 10, 17

1917
13. The Killer - All-Story Weekly 4 parts Apr 7, 14, 21, 28
14. The Compass in the Sky - The People's Magazine May
15. The Unknown Quantity - All-Story Weekly 3 parts Aug 25, Sep 1, 8
16. Solomon’s Decision - All-Story Weekly 3 parts Dec 1, 8, 15

1918
17. The Storehouse of Past Events - People's Favorite Magazine Feb 10
18. The Moving Shadow - People's Favorite Magazine Jun 10
19. The Stars Were Looking - Top Notch Jul 1
20. The Black Butterfly - All-Story Weekly 4 parts Sep 14, 21, 24, Oct 5
21. The Trial in the Dust - People's Favorite Magazine Oct 25

1919
22. Stars of Evil - All-Story Weekly 3 parts Jan 25, Feb 1, 8
23. The Ivory Pipe - All-Story Weekly 3 parts Sep 20, 27, Oct 4

1920
24. House of the Hundred Lights - All-Story Weekly 4 parts May 22, 29.
Jun 5, 12
25. Black and White -Argosy All-Story Weekly 4 parts Oct 2, 9, 16, 23

1921
26. Wolf of Erlik - Argosy All-Story Weekly 4 parts Oct 22, 29, Nov 5, 12

1923
27. The Opposing Venus - Argosy All-Story Weekly 4 parts Oct 13,20, 27, Nov 3

1924
28. Poor Little Pigeon - Argosy All-Story Weekly 5 parts Aug 9, 16,
23, 30, Sep 6

1926
29. The House of Invisible Bondage - Argosy All-Story Weekly 4 parts
Sep 18, 25, Oct 2, 9

1929
30. The Woolly Dog - Argosy All-Story Weekly 4 parts Mar 23, 30, Apr 6, 13

1931
31. The Green Goddess - Argosy 6 parts Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 21, 28, Mar 7

1934
32. The Ledger of Life - Argosy 4 parts Jun 30, Jul 7, 14, 21


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3 comments:

Walker Martin said...

For decades, lovers of the bizarre and unusual have wondered why the popular Semi-Dual stories were never published in hardcover or paperback. Giesy and Smith were often paid 2 cents a word and received hundreds of dollars for each story, most of which were serials and complete short novels. This was back when $25 a week was a good salary.

Semi-Dual was more popular than any other occult detective, appearing in over 30 stories. Giesy is best remembered however for his Palos Trilogy.

Prince Omar of Persia got the name Semi-Dual by solving problems with two solutions, one material and one occult. When Altus Press publishes this series it will be a major pulp reprinting project.

And the mystery of why the Semi-Dual series was never collected in book form will finally be of no concern for mystery readers.

Laurie Powers said...

Thanks for the info, Walker. I had no idea they were so popular. They must have been if the writers were getting 2 cents a word back when so many others were getting one cent or even half a cent.

Matt Moring said...

Thanks for the plug, Laurie! I have let people know that the motivation to get rolling on this came from a conversation at Pulpfest with Walker, Digges & co. I'm really surprised that this series has never been mined before.