Sunday, July 10, 2011

Ken Maynard Revisited, with Link to Full-Length Movie

Davy Crockett's Almanack has a wonderful gallery of Ken Maynard movie posters. If you're curious about Maynard's movies, Turner Classic Movies will be playing one of his movies, In Old Santa Fe, on Friday, July 29. You can view TCM's full schedule for the month here.

If you can't wait until the 29th, you can go here to see a full-length Ken Maynard movie that's in the public domain: Tombstone Canyon (1932).

And if you want to read (or re-read) my post on Ken Maynard from a while back, go here.




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5 comments:

Walker Martin said...

I see your previous post has comments about Jon Tuska's excellent book, THE FILMING OF THE WEST. This is an enormous book full of interviews with actors and film makers before they bit the dust. An essential reference...

Barry Traylor said...

TCM ran Red River this past weekend. This is one of those movies that if it is on I can't resist sitting through once again. One of my favorite Western movies. Incidentally it is also my favorite Montgomery Clift film.
For some reason when I saw that you were writing about Ken Maynard this struck a cord as Tom Tyler had a small part in Red River. Just me I suppose but Tyler and Maynard have a similar appearance. Tyler sure died young.

Ed Hulse said...

TOMBSTONE CANYON, by the way, is an adaptation of a Claude Rister yarn written for the pulp magazine WILD WEST STORIES AND COMPLETE NOVEL. I did a pulp-to-film comparison of CANYON for the first issue of BLOOD 'N' THUNDER, and that article is included in THE BEST OF BLOOD 'N' THUNDER -- which, if you'll forgive the shameless plug, debuts at PulpFest later this month.

Richard R. said...

We used to get TCM as part of our basic cable package in SoCal, here it's part of a $12 extra per month "package", the rest of which aren't things I'm interested in, so sadly that's out. I used to watch it a lot.

Anonymous said...

Ben Mankiewicz, introducing "The Carpetbaggers" on TCM, said that the character Nevada Smith was based on Ken Maynard. So did rottentomatoes.com. I personally don't see that much similarity. Or, no more similarity to Maynard than to almost any other silent movie cowboy star.