Tuesday, April 26, 2011

The Royal Wedding, Pulp Fiction Style

To celebrate the Royal Wedding on Friday, here are a sample of British pulp magazines through the years. Most of these were sister publications to those that originated in the United States, and many were reprints of stories that had appeared first in the Yankee counterparts.

BIG BOOK DETECTIVE, 194x, No. 1

COWBOY STORIES, 1934 No.3

EMPIRE FRONTIER, March 1930

FBI DETECTIVE STORIES, July 1950

SCARLET GANG SMASHERS, 194x

SECRET SERVICE OPERATOR NO. 5, 194x

SPIDER UK, 1941

STARTLING MYSTERY

TERROR TALES, May 1941

TEXAS RANGERS, December 1943

THRILLING RANCH STORIES, October 1947

THRILLING WESTERN, December 1941

WEST, March 1928

WESTERN ADVENTURES, April 1936

WINGS, August 1935




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6 comments:

BISH said...

Great covers! Thanks!

darwination said...

Nice post! I wonder why sometimes the American cover is used (The Spider and West issues jump out at me) while with others a British artist copies the American cover or comes up with an original composition? It doesn't seem to me like the Brits had a very strong school of pulp painting until maybe the paperback boom of the 50s. I do have a couple of girlie pulps where I think the Brit has improved upon the original, but more often than not it seems to really go the other way...

Deka Black said...

First cover is the best: "Bullets Are my Bounty" is a really good title.

Barry Traylor said...

I have never collected U.K. or Canadian pulps except by accident in an auction lot. Usually I would drop them like a hot potato as soon as I would notice they were a reprint edition. I seem to recall at least one person that collected Canadian editions of Weird Tales, but I always thought the way they airbrushed the Brundage covers in the 1930's a bit on the creepy side.

Barry Traylor said...

Something darwination said triggered my memory. I seem to recall being told years ago how so many American pulp magazines wound up in Britain. They were used as ballast in the holds of freighters. I also have a hunch that so many U.S. covers were used was because it was cheaper to use the same cover just make a new printing plate and replace the U.S. price with a British price. The profit margin was very low for the publishers so they did not waste a penny they did not need to.

Cap'n Bob said...

Love the covers, especially the Operator 5 giant boring machine on tracks.

WV: keepers. Yep, these covers are all keepers. Jeepers!