Thursday, December 30, 2010

Keep Warm with a Fire of Pulp Covers

Not literally.

It's freezing here in Los Angeles this morning, but I know it's nothing compared to what the rest of the country is experiencing. Here are some pulp covers to keep you toasty.

I had the hardest time finding covers with a fireplace theme. I guess most magazines considered being out in a blizzard was a more exciting cover theme rather than inside out of the elements, where most smart people would be.

Some of these covers are necessarily comforting, but at least they're warm.

And of course we start with one of the ladies' favorites: the famous lumberjack of ADVENTURE. Imagine: a lumberjack that reads!

ADVENTURE, June 18, 1919

FAR WEST ILLUSTRATED, January 1928

RANGELAND ROMANCES, June 1935

WEIRD TALES, April 1937

FIRESIDE GHOST STORIES, Dec. 1937

WEIRD TALES, August 1938

RANCH ROMANCES, February No. 2, 1940

RANCH ROMANCES, February No. 2, 1941

RANGELAND ROMANCES, March 1946




Bookmark and Share

7 comments:

Deka Black said...

My favorite? RANGELAND ROMANCES, March 1946. It have a calm and sweet feeling (eh, a guy can be romantic too, right? ;) )

Barry Traylor said...

Oh My! When I first read the headline on your post I was a bit startled to say the least. Perhaps Walker will know this story as I think it was Rick Minter that told it to me. He (or someone else) bought a large amount of pulps in excellent condition except for one small thing. They all had a small hole through the magazine in the upper left corner. The person they were purchased from used them as insulation inside his house!

Richard R. said...

Freezing? Hey, it's 34 here. But then where you are, it could get that cold, I guess. Love the images, thanks!

Ron Scheer said...

Buddy of mine many years ago was a gypo logger in Idaho and a great reader. Thanks again for the covers.

Walker Martin said...

I remember Minter also telling me about the pulps being used for insulation. This was back in the days when you could buy them really cheap, for alot less than a dollar each. More than one old timer also told me how every outhouse had a stack of pulps, and not just for reading.

Barry Traylor said...

I really like the June 1935 issue of Rangeland Romances. I thought at first it might be a Baumhofer, but after checking the book I have on his work I see it is not. I wonder if it was done by Tom Lovell?

Cap'n Bob Napier said...

I just got back from a very cold cabin whose main source of heat was an iron stove. I could have used one of those images to warm me.