Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Spooky......The Story With No Name, Part 13

Just in time for Halloween, The Story With No Name Part 13 continues at the Broken Trails blog. You can also catch the first 12 parts of the story with the links provided on Broken Trails.

And while we're on the subject of Halloween, here's some covers to get us in the mood.














16 comments:

Barry said...

Nice covers Laurie! I espcially like the Complete Detective. Skulls and skeletons have long been a favorite of mine on a pulp cover. It sure has influenced my purchase of more than a few of them over the years.
Have to get busy as I have about nine pumpkins to hollow out for Jack O' Lanterns!

Laurie Powers said...

My - now I know where you've been the last few days - running amok with a knife. Have fun.

Charles Gramlich said...

Love those covers. All the skulls and skeletons and ghouls. Right at home for Halloween

Richard Prosch said...

Great stuff. I bought a great many "horror" comics from DC and Charlton in the '70s based on similar simple yet effective skull and ghost covers.

Walker Martin said...

Raphael Desoto once told me at Pulpcon that he was encouraged by art editors to paint skulls and skeletons because they sold more issues on the newstands.

They always are eyecatchers.

Laurie Powers said...

I'm glad you all are enjoying them. Actually I was surprised that I didn't have others with a Halloween theme - I guess that's what I get when I have mostly Westerns and very little Weird Tales.

Barry said...

Seeing as I love Halloween so much I have been on the lookout for years for true Halloween themed pulp covers. The only two I have is a love pulp and a copy of a western pulp. The general fiction mags had them (Saturday Evening Post, etc.) but for some reason the pulps did not do them. I have a theory why but it is a bit long winded and I am a very slow typist.
I'd like Walker's opinion regarding this.

Walker Martin said...

Some pulp titles made a big thing about the Christmas and New Year holiday period, especially the titles published by Street & Smith and Munsey. Such magazines like Western Story, Detective Story, Popular Magazine, Argosy, all had big Holiday issues with festive covers.

Halloween, on the other hand, simply did not have the same impact as Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years. It was mainly a day for kids to dress up and go treat or treating. Some adults put on costumes also but it's mainly for children. Also you don't have the big dinners associated with such holidays as the above or July 4.

At least that's my take on why the pulps did not celebrate Halloween on their covers. Anybody else have a theory?

Laurie Powers said...

I agree with Walker. Halloween was, at least when I was growing up, not as big of a deal as Christmas. And it definitely didn't have the huge commercial aspect it does now.

Barry said...

Having a Halloween party for adults was still a big thing in the 1920's. I have seen some of the Dennison Co. Bogie Books from that time period and it has instructions on how to put on a Halooween party for adults. The Bogie books began in the teens and continued until at least 1935. I have a copy of the 1935 issue but thones from the years 1915 to 1928 are very difficult to find and very pricey. Mainly they are catalogs of the Halloween paper products that Dennison made. But they had great covers. The Depression had a (no pun intended) depressing effect on Halloween, and World War II likewise do to rationing. The kids holiday Walker and I remember really came to being in the post war period.

Barry said...

This should give you some idea what the Bogie Books were like.
http://www.bookthink.com/0106/106beh1.htm

Barry said...

Actually the Halloween I love is the vintage one. Not like the current rage for stuff that looks like an autopsy room.

Laurie Powers said...

that article looks fascinating, Barry. I'm going to look at that later when I can. And I'm with you on the blood and gore - I think we've talked before about the whole 'torture porn' concept.

pattinase (abbott) said...

I would love to stumble on these in an antique store someday. Wow.

Barry said...

Halloween, as a commonly celebrated US event, truly came into its own in the very early 1920s. Parties then were primarily for adults, with guests settling in to play mahjong, bridge or other games. Tables and walls would be decorated with a wide array of Halloween-themed items, really setting the party’s mood. The games’ winners would be given prizes to take home, like candy containers, lanterns or noisemakers. Only later did “trick or treating” come into vogue, with the holiday becoming then more firmly oriented toward children.

I'm on a roll now! Get me started about my favorite holiday (not that Christmas is low on my list as I read A Christmas Carol every year) and I don't know when to stop. From some of the research I have done about Halloween it seems that some areas of the country were more prone to celebrate the holiday in years past.
Growing up in the late 1940's it was a really big deal for me and where I lived.

Laurie Powers said...

Keep going Barry. I didn't know Halloween was your favorite holiday but now that I think about it, it makes total sense. lol. By the way, has anyone looked at my post about Remington Schuyler yet? I wonder if he did any Halloween covers - I doubt it.